Ukraine betting bills conflicting on key issues, says Parimatch

Ukraine betting legislation Parimatch
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Betting legislation is picking up pace in the Ukraine parliament with seven new bills alternative to the initial law submitted by cabinet ministers in October.

 

In an update on the legislative process, international betting holding, Parimatch, explained that despite the promising developments, of the seven only five have been made public, each with conflicting provisions on many key issues. “When analysing the different versions of the submitted legislative proposals, one can outline the commonalities and differences in the legislators’ approach on the legalization of gambling industry in Ukraine,” said the firm.

“The numerous conflicting points in different versions of the draft laws indicate the difficulties in agreeing a final law which would suit all interested parties. However, the number of proposed amendments to the draft law demonstrates the high level of interest in the legalization of the industry by the executive and legislative branches.”

The bills authors all agree a need to regulate the industry by establishing a separate government agency; introduce tax rates on turnover and income (already mainly stipulated by the current Tax Code) and to toughen the responsibility for the illegal organization of games. Only in some bills are there measures for law enforcement to take action against illegal gambling business.

However, Parimatch points out that legislators differ on the number of gambling facilities and their location as well as the “need for fiscalization through payment transaction registers and the taxation of gaming operators, which remains beyond the scope of the proposed bills.”

Other differences include the number of licences to be issued; the size of license payments; the rigidity and conservatism of state regulation of the industry; customer identification (i.e. through passport or individual tax number) and; the need for a transition period for new legislation.


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